Do You Need an FSA ID?

The FSA ID is your Federal Student Aid ID. It’s a username and password that you’ll use to submit your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) each year that you’re seeking financial aid for college.

It’s best to create your FSA ID before you complete your FAFSA. In fact, now is the perfect time for you to create yours since the new FAFSA will be available October 1.

Your FSA ID can also be used to log on to other financial aid websites. It’s your unique electronic signature, so you should never share it with anyone—not even your parents or financial aid personnel at the college you choose to attend. You must create your own FSA ID; parents of dependent students should not create an ID for their children, and vice versa.

We suggest writing down the information you enter as you create your FSA ID. The easiest way to do so is by using the FSA ID worksheet, available in English and Spanish at UCanGo2.org. Once you’ve filled in the worksheet, be sure to store it in a safe place. Consider putting it in the file that contains one or more recent tax returns (yours and/or your parents’) so you will have it handy when the next FAFSA season rolls around.

For more information about how to plan, prepare and pay for college, visit UCanGo2.org, OKcollegestart.org and StartWithFAFSA.org.

The FAFSA is Always Free

When we hear the word “free” we’re usually excited, but then we think, “wait a minute – what’s the catch?” We’ve been conditioned to believe that nothing is ever free. Well, that’s not the case with the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA. The FAFSA really is a free application! There aren’t any gimmicks, conditions, 30-day trial periods or necessary payments. The FAFSA is a free application that helps colleges determine your eligibility for financial aid – money to help cover educational expenses. In order to access this application, you’ll need to log in to FAFSA.gov. This is the official website to submit your FAFSA. Other sites may require you to pay a fee to submit your application, but FAFSA.gov won’t.

What else should you know about this free application? You’ll need a username and a password to log in and sign your FAFSA. You can create your login, also called an FSA ID, at fsaid.ed.gov. There shouldn’t be any fees to create your login, either. Once you submit your application, the colleges that receive your FAFSA can assist you with any concerns you may have about your financial aid eligibility or financial aid offer; be sure to contact them with questions. Don’t fall for scams that state you must pay (anything!) to submit your FAFSA. Remember that no payment is required because the FAFSA is always free!

Everyone Should Apply

Have you been told that the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, is only for students with good grades? What about the myth that the FAFSA is only for those with a certain income? If you have heard these, you have been given the wrong information. The FAFSA is for everyone who plans on attending college. This application shows a school your eligibility to receive financial aid, or funds to help you pay for college. Financial aid comes in the form of grants, work-study and student loans. If you are a high school senior, current college student or an adult learner going back to school, you should submit a FAFSA.

The FAFSA doesn’t ask for your grades or transcripts. Instead, it inquires about your financial information to see how much aid you’re eligible to receive. Not only could submitting your FAFSA determine your eligibility for federal financial aid (grants, work-study and student loans), but it could also determine your eligibility for aid given specifically to students at your college. Other scholarships may also require you to submit a FAFSA. Therefore, put aside those legendary tales and see what financial aid you could receive. It’s better to learn that you qualify for some aid, then to completely miss it because you decided not to apply. Don’t believe the myths, learn more about the FAFSA for yourself at FAFSA.gov and StartWithFAFSA.org.