Category Archives: Apply Online

Should I Apply for OTAG?

Short answer: Yes! No separate application is necessary, but you DO have to submit a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to apply.

The Oklahoma Tuition Aid Grant Program (OTAG) is a need-based grant program for Oklahoma residents who attend eligible colleges, universities and career technology centers in the state. Awards are approved for full-time or part-time undergraduate students. Children of military personnel from other states who currently reside in Oklahoma may also qualify for OTAG.


OTAG is a grant based on financial need, which is determined by the data students submit on their FAFSA. To apply for OTAG, a student simply has to complete a FAFSA. Typically, OTAG receives more eligible applications than can be awarded with available funds, so it’s important that your FAFSA is submitted on or shortly after October 1 each year.


Currently, the maximum annual OTAG award is the lesser of 75 percent of enrollment costs or $1,000 for students attending public colleges, universities or career technology centers, and $1,300 for students attending eligible private colleges or universities.


Another grant available from the State of Oklahoma is the Oklahoma Tuition Equalization Grant (OTEG). It’s a need-based grant for Oklahoma residents enrolled as full-time undergraduates at certain qualified Oklahoma not-for-profit, private/independent institutions of higher education. Students must complete a FAFSA to apply. To receive OTEG, a student must also have an annual family income of $50,000 or less. OTEG award amounts are $2,000 per academic year or $1,000 per academic semester. To see a list of schools eligible to offer OTEG awards, visit OKcollegestart.org/Financial_Aid_Planning.

Do You Need an FSA ID?

The FSA ID is your Federal Student Aid ID. It’s a username and password that you’ll use to submit your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) each year that you’re seeking financial aid for college.

It’s best to create your FSA ID before you complete your FAFSA. In fact, now is the perfect time for you to create yours since the new FAFSA will be available October 1.

Your FSA ID can also be used to log on to other financial aid websites. It’s your unique electronic signature, so you should never share it with anyone—not even your parents or financial aid personnel at the college you choose to attend. You must create your own FSA ID; parents of dependent students should not create an ID for their children, and vice versa.

We suggest writing down the information you enter as you create your FSA ID. The easiest way to do so is by using the FSA ID worksheet, available in English and Spanish at UCanGo2.org. Once you’ve filled in the worksheet, be sure to store it in a safe place. Consider putting it in the file that contains one or more recent tax returns (yours and/or your parents’) so you will have it handy when the next FAFSA season rolls around.

For more information about how to plan, prepare and pay for college, visit UCanGo2.org, OKcollegestart.org and StartWithFAFSA.org.

The FAFSA is Always Free

When we hear the word “free” we’re usually excited, but then we think, “wait a minute – what’s the catch?” We’ve been conditioned to believe that nothing is ever free. Well, that’s not the case with the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA. The FAFSA really is a free application! There aren’t any gimmicks, conditions, 30-day trial periods or necessary payments. The FAFSA is a free application that helps colleges determine your eligibility for financial aid – money to help cover educational expenses. In order to access this application, you’ll need to log in to FAFSA.gov. This is the official website to submit your FAFSA. Other sites may require you to pay a fee to submit your application, but FAFSA.gov won’t.

What else should you know about this free application? You’ll need a username and a password to log in and sign your FAFSA. You can create your login, also called an FSA ID, at fsaid.ed.gov. There shouldn’t be any fees to create your login, either. Once you submit your application, the colleges that receive your FAFSA can assist you with any concerns you may have about your financial aid eligibility or financial aid offer; be sure to contact them with questions. Don’t fall for scams that state you must pay (anything!) to submit your FAFSA. Remember that no payment is required because the FAFSA is always free!

Everyone Should Apply

Have you been told that the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, is only for students with good grades? What about the myth that the FAFSA is only for those with a certain income? If you have heard these, you have been given the wrong information. The FAFSA is for everyone who plans on attending college. This application shows a school your eligibility to receive financial aid, or funds to help you pay for college. Financial aid comes in the form of grants, work-study and student loans. If you are a high school senior, current college student or an adult learner going back to school, you should submit a FAFSA.

The FAFSA doesn’t ask for your grades or transcripts. Instead, it inquires about your financial information to see how much aid you’re eligible to receive. Not only could submitting your FAFSA determine your eligibility for federal financial aid (grants, work-study and student loans), but it could also determine your eligibility for aid given specifically to students at your college. Other scholarships may also require you to submit a FAFSA. Therefore, put aside those legendary tales and see what financial aid you could receive. It’s better to learn that you qualify for some aid, then to completely miss it because you decided not to apply. Don’t believe the myths, learn more about the FAFSA for yourself at FAFSA.gov and StartWithFAFSA.org.   

What’s The Big Deal About The FAFSA?

The FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) is the key you need to unlock money that will help you pay for college, vocational school or other education after high school. It’s simply a statement about a family’s financial situation, and it’s used to determine how much federal financial aid a student may be eligible to receive. You have an 85% chance of getting money for college just by completing this important form.

A new FAFSA is available October 1 each year. For high school seniors, this means yours will be ready for you to submit in October, almost a year before you begin college! You can submit your FAFSA even if you haven’t applied to any colleges yet. In fact, if you’re not sure which college you want to attend, you can request that your FAFSA information be shared with up to 10 different campuses that you may want to learn more about.

The current FAFSA is available online at fafsa.gov. If you’d like a sneak peek at the FAFSA, there are two options you may want to consider.
• The FAFSA4caster can give you a free early estimate of your eligibility for federal student aid. Visit fafsa.gov and scroll down to Early Aid Estimate.
The FAFSA on the Web (FOTW) Worksheet lists most of the questions from the FAFSA, giving you an idea of what information you’ll need to have with you when you begin to fill it out.

Please keep in mind that neither of these tools is a replacement for the real FAFSA. You’ll still need to complete the actual form online after October 1 in order to apply for financial aid.

During the 2018-2019 school year, $2.6B dollars in federal financial aid for college was left unclaimed by students who would have been qualified to receive the aid, simply because they didn’t submit a FAFSA. You’ll never know what you’re eligible for unless you submit the application.

Welcome Back to School

Back-to-school season is well underway! Before you let out a sigh of frustration because the summer flew by, decide how you’ll make this school year the best one yet. Will you be engaged in class? Will you intentionally make a new friend? Will you take on a new interest? The ball is in your court this month, so make a plan to seize the opportunities of a new school year.

To get you started on the right foot, think about joining a club or sports team. If you’re already involved in a certain activity, think about taking on a leadership role. You’ll gain communication skills and meet new people. You may also enjoy a school play or music recital. Attending different types of events like these could give you a greater appreciation for your school. Additionally, consider volunteering. Devoting some time to a cause that’s important to you is a good way to give back to your community, and you may discover a few interesting career options as you volunteer. Volunteer work can also be an asset when applying for scholarships.

Own your education this year. Challenge yourself to maintain good grades and if you’re struggling in a specific subject area, ask questions. Find resources that can help you understand difficult concepts. Conversely, if you’re excelling in a certain course that others may find tough, contemplate tutoring a few classmates. Doing this will show your concern for others and increase your own knowledge. Practice time management skills, as well. Make it a goal to turn in all assignments on time and keep the lines of communication open with your instructors. Let them know if you’ll miss a deadline.

Finally, prepare for what’s next. High school students can take FREE practice tests for the ACT and SAT to increase their scores. Free test prep material can be found at OKcollegestart.org. Seniors and college students who will need financial aid next year should complete and submit the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) as soon after Oct. 1 as possible. The FAFSA determines your eligibility for various types of financial aid – resources to help you cover college expenses. College students can start developing their resumes. Visit your campus Career Services department to learn about all available opportunities. And all students should apply for scholarships! Whether you’re a junior in high school or a sophomore in college, it’s never too early or too late to take advantage of these opportunities. You can find numerous scholarships at UCanGo2.org and OKcollegestart.org.

There are plenty of things to look forward to as you begin a new school year. So instead of dragging your feet on your first day of class, decide that you’ll make this school year the best yet! Welcome back and have a great year!

Should I Complete the FAFSA as a Nontraditional Student?

If you’ve decided to go to college as a nontraditional student or as an adult learner then congratulations! It’s never too late to learn and grow. Now that you’ve made this decision, it’s time to think about financial aid – monetary support that helps cover the costs of college such as grants, student loans and scholarships. You might assume that you won’t qualify for financial assistance because you’re a nontraditional student, but there are various financial resources to help you on your college journey. One resource that you should utilize first is the Free Application for Federal Student Aid or FAFSA. Regardless of your educational background or age, you should always submit a FAFSA every year that you’re in need of financial aid. The FAFSA allows you to apply for federal and some state financial assistance for college. Your school’s financial aid office will use the information you provide on the application to determine your aid eligibility. They will be able to see if you qualify for grants, work-study and/or student loans. In case you haven’t decided which school you’ll attend, the FAFSA can be sent to up to ten schools at one time. Once you’ve submitted your FAFSA, be sure to contact the financial aid offices if you have any questions.

Whether this is your first time submitting a FAFSA or it’s been a while since you’ve seen the application, here are a few tips to help you successfully complete the form:

Gather your materials – Before you start the application you’ll need to round up a few necessary items: your social security card, tax returns and other financial information. The FAFSA will ask you to provide your income figures as well as your personal identification information. Your W-2s and other bank statements will be helpful with this section of the FAFSA.

Create an FSA ID – An FSA ID (Federal Student Aid Identification) is your username and password for logging into FAFSA.gov. This login will also serve as your electronic signature for completing the FAFSA. It only takes about ten minutes to create an FSA ID. During the process you will be asked to provide your identification information and select a few challenge questions to answer in case you need to reset your ID at a later date. Use this FSA ID Worksheet to help you keep track of your FSA ID information. To create your FSA ID, go to fsaid.ed.gov.

Use the correct website FAFSA.gov is the official website to access the FAFSA form. You can also find the application by using the myStudentAid mobile app. The first “f” in FAFSA stands for “free”, meaning you should never be charged a fee to submit your FAFSA. Using one of the above options guarantees that you’ll not have to pay to complete your application.

Remember Oct. 1 – The FAFSA opens each year on Oct. 1. You should complete your FAFSA as soon as possible after this date. Some financial aid that you’re eligible to receive may be on a first-come first-serve basis, concluding that funds will be given to those who apply first and will eventually run out after a certain point. Therefore, to ensure that you don’t miss out on any financial aid, complete your application in a timely manner.

Selective Service and the FAFSA

The FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) currently has over 100 questions. One of those questions is about Selective Service and it’s often answered incorrectly. So, what is Selective Service and why do you need to be registered?

The Selective Service system is an independent agency of the U.S. government tasked with providing manpower to the Department of Defense should there be a national emergency. Federal law requires all male U.S. citizens, regardless of where they live, and male immigrants, whether documented or undocumented, residing in the U.S. to register with Selective Service. If you’re a male student completing the FAFSA, you must register with Selective Service to be eligible to receive federal student aid. Female applicants aren’t required to register and won’t see this question on their digital FAFSA.

Registration with Selective Service must be completed between the ages of 18 through 25. If you’re not yet 18, no worries! By checking ‘Register Me’ on your FAFSA, you’ll automatically be signed up for Selective Service once you reach 18. In either case, all males are required to register within 30 days of their 18th birthday. You also have the option to pre-register when you’re at least 17 years and 3 months old. If you’re 26 or older and didn’t register for Selective Service, you should contact your school’s financial aid office. They will provide you with instructions on the next steps to take.

Males may visit SSS.gov to find more information about the Selective Service requirement.

Finish the FAFSA this February!

The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) has been available since October 1, but that doesn’t mean it’s too late to apply! You can still apply to receive federal and state student aid in the form of grants, work-study and loans by submitting your FAFSA. Many students don’t apply at all and forgo FREE money for college! Below are some common reasons students miss out on financial aid.

Myth: If I’m not poor, very smart or super-talented, I won’t qualify for financial aid.

Reality: While it is true that the FAFSA is a need-based program, there are many factors other than income that go into the calculation. You never know if you qualify unless you apply. Plus, the FAFSA is used for more than just federal aid. Many universities and foundations require that you complete a FAFSA to be eligible for their scholarships.

 

Myth: I have several scholarships lined up, so I don’t need to submit a FAFSA.

Reality: College expenses include more than just tuition and fees – don’t forget about, books, room and board and transportation, among other potential costs. Submit your FAFSA to explore other funding possibilities in the event that your scholarships don’t cover all of your costs. You can always turn down aid that’s offered to you.

 

Myth: I’m going to pay my own way through college, so there’s no need to complete a FAFSA.

Reality: Paying your own way through college is a great plan, and completing the FAFSA could allow you to keep more of that money in your pocket. Applying for federal aid has become easier and can significantly reduce your financial burden. A few minutes of your time is definitely worth the potential for thousands of dollars in aid.

Complete your application for federal student aid today at FAFSA.gov!

What is Verification?

After completing your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), you will receive an email with a link to your Student Aid Report (SAR). The SAR is a document that recaps the data you provided on the FAFSA and offers some basic information about your eligibility for federal financial aid. On this SAR, you may read that you’ve been selected for verification. Typically an asterisk appears next to the Expected Family Contribution (EFC) number near the upper right corner on the SAR, which indicates your information must be verified.

Verification is a process in which the school’s financial aid office must confirm the information provided on your FAFSA is accurate. About one-third of all students are selected for verification because questions may have been left blank, the data provided is inconsistent, or they’re just randomly chosen. If this happens, don’t worry. The financial aid office at the schools you’ve applied to will contact you and request additional documentation they’ll need to complete the verification process. Be sure to respond promptly and meet all deadlines set by financial aid personnel.

After you submit the requested materials to your school’s aid office, follow up with them to ensure it’s been received. Remember, you must complete the verification process in order to receive any federal or state student aid. If you have questions about the process, contact your school’s financial aid office.