Category Archives: Apply Online

Summer scholarships

School is out for the summer and now is the perfect time to find free money!

Many scholarships have deadlines from May-August and the awards can be applied to the upcoming school year. The more scholarships a student applies for, the greater their chance of being selected a winner. We suggest that students apply for at least 1-2 scholarships per week. There are plenty of scholarships that only require a simple application and/or a short essay. A little effort can reap great financial benefits, so check out these fun summer scholarships:

Earnest Scholarship Fund

Earnest is giving away scholarships to both undergraduate and graduate students. There is no essay. Applicants just need to complete a short survey providing degree and contact information. Students can be US citizens or permanent residents – this includes DACA students. With 50 scholarships available, don’t miss out on this opportunity!

Award Amount: 50 awards; $5,000
Deadline: May 20, 2021
Learn more and apply for the Earnest Scholarship Fund.

Make Us Laugh Scholarship

Ownage Pranks is an improv comedy brand that is offering a scholarship to an undergraduate student. Applicants must be enrolled or due to be enrolled as a full-time student at an accredited college or university. There is no GPA requirement. All domestic, international and undocumented students are eligible to apply. Students must create a 3-5-minute comedic video which showcases comedic talent. Additionally, students must submit proof of enrollment.

Award Amount: $1,000
Deadline: May 31, 2021
Learn more and apply for the Make Us Laugh Scholarship.

Jane Austen Society of North America (JASNA) Essay Contest

JASNA conducts an annual student essay contest to foster the study and appreciation of Jane Austen’s work. The contest is open to all students and is divided into three categories: high school, college/university and graduate school. To apply, students must read their category’s prompt and submit a well-written essay answering the passage. For all categories, students will connect Jane Austen’s novels to her Juvenilia – short stories, plays and chapters she wrote as a teenager.

Award Amount: 9 awards; (3) $1,000; (3) $500; (3) $250
Deadline: June 1, 2021
Learn more and apply for the JASNA Essay Contest.

Stuck at Prom Scholarship Contest

Duck Brand Duct Tape is giving high school students a chance to show off their creativity. They are offering scholarships to the students who can make the best prom attire out of Duck Tape. Applicants can document their process in a short video or a written essay. Students don’t need to worry about wearing their creations to prom. They just need to share their promwear virtually. There will be a Grand Prize Winner and a Runner Up in both the Dress and Tux Category.

Award Amount: 4 awards; $500-$10,000
Deadline: July 21, 2021
Learn more and apply for the Stuck at Prom Scholarship Contest.

Want to find more scholarships? Check out UCanGo2.org!

When you are submitting your scholarship applications, be sure to remember these tips:

  • Check your eligibility: Some (not all) scholarships have age, grade level or GPA requirements. Be sure you are eligible before investing your time in an application.
  • Check the requirements: Do you have all of the documentation required for your scholarship? Do you need letters of recommendation? Be sure to double check that you’re prepared to submit a complete application.
  • Proofread: Verify that your contact information is correct on scholarship applications. Also, make sure you review your essay, if one is required. Represent yourself well with professional and clear writing.

Don’t Rely on Luck to Pay Your Way

Wouldn’t it be great if you could find that pot o’ gold at the end of the rainbow to help you pay for college?  As luck would have it, a free ride to college just isn’t in the cards for most folks. Your next best bet is to submit the FAFSA, or Free Application for Federal Student Aid. By submitting the FAFSA, you’re able to determine how much federal and state aid you may be eligible to receive to help pay for college.

Already submitted the FAFSA? It’s never too late to start applying for scholarships. Be sure to take advantage of the helpful information provided in UCanGo2’s Scholarship Success Guide to help you as you go.

Also check out these websites for scholarship opportunities: UCanGo2. org and OKcollegestart.org.

screenshots of websites

Financial Aid Awareness Month

February is Financial Aid Awareness Month! This is the time for you to learn all about the financial aid process for college.

What is financial aid?
Free Money

Federal and State Grants

Scholarships

Earned Money

Borrowed Money

How do I apply?

  • Complete the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid)
    • Apply every year you need financial aid for college
    • Apply on or after October 1
    • Complete your application online at FAFSA.gov
    • Create an FSA ID to access and sign your FAFSA

How will I know how much financial aid I’ve been offered?

  • After your FAFSA has been submitted and you’ve been admitted, your school will send you an aid offer
  • Review and research all programs offered, and accept only the aid you need
  • You don’t have to accept everything you’ve been offered

To learn more about the financial aid process, review these tools on this site:

  • FAFSA Learning Modules
  • Finish the FAFSA in Five Steps
  • Dependency Questionnaire
  • FAFSA Fundamentals 2021-2022 PowerPoint
  • FAFSA Parent Flyer

You will also find these helpful FAFSA videos:

UCanGo2.org also offers many beneficial FAFSA resources:

  • The EFC (Expected Family Contribution) PowerPoint
  • The FSA ID (Federal Student Aid Identification) PowerPoint
  • The Financial Aid Award Letter PowerPoint

Learn more about Financial Aid Awareness Month here!

Student Financial Aid Acronyms

Every profession has a unique set of acronyms used in that particular field. As you plan for college and begin to explore different ways to pay for higher education, you may come across some acronyms commonly found in the world of student financial aid. We’ve listed some here, with a brief explanation of each.

AGI                 Adjusted Gross Income – A dollar amount found on your, and/or your parents’, tax return that must be reported on your FAFSA.

CARES           Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act – A relief package passed in March, 2020 to protect the American people from the public health and economic impacts of COVID-19. The borrower benefits in the Act were extended to September 30, 2021.

COA                Cost of Attendance – The average annual cost for attending a specific college, university, technology center or proprietary school, which includes tuition, room and board, books, fees, supplies, personal expenses and transportation.

EFC                 Expected Family Contribution – A number found on your Student Aid Report (SAR) that’s used by a financial office to determine how much aid you’re eligible to receive.

FAFSA            Free Application for Federal Student Aid – A form submitted by you that is used to determine your eligibility for federal and state financial aid. One or both parents may also need to contribute their financial information.

FSA                 Federal Student Aid – The branch of the U.S. Department of Education that oversees federal financial aid disbursed to higher education institutions for students who qualify.

FSA ID            Federal Student Aid Identification – A username and password that gives you access to some of the U.S. Department of Education’s websites; it can also serve as your legal signature on the FAFSA and other electronic documents.

ISIR                 Institutional Student Information Record – A report sent to your selected college(s) that contains the data from your FAFSA.

MPN                Master Promissory Note – A document signed by you that says you promise to repay a student loan, along with any accrued interest and fees.

SAR                Student Aid Report – Contains the data submitted on your FAFSA, along with next-step instructions. Once the FAFSA is processed, you’ll receive information on how to download and print the report.

For a much larger list of the many acronyms and terms used throughout the federal financial aid process, visit StudentAid.ed.gov.

The New FAFSA Mobile App

Have you completed your 2021-2022 FAFSA yet? If not, now’s the time! In fact, you can complete this important financial aid application directly on your phone or tablet.

The new myStudentAid mobile app has recently been released with an updated look and a variety of new tools provided by Federal Student Aid (FSA). This app offers a more user-friendly design, as well as a Financial Aid Summary that allows you to keep track of your student loan and grant history. It also offers the ability for borrowers to track their loan repayment progress.

To access this tool, students, parents and borrowers will need to download FSA’s myStudentAid app. From there you can set up your FSA ID, or use your current ID to complete and submit your FAFSA as well as take advantage of these new features. Check out the updated myStudentAid app today!

Mobile phone screenshots of the app

Make the Most of Your Holiday Season!

This time of year brings merriment and joy to those as they celebrate the holiday festivities. And while you’re enjoying a few weeks off from school, why not spend a little time preparing for college? If you’re currently a high school senior you should complete and submit your FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) to apply for federal and state aid.

You should also do a little scholarship searching. Scholarships provide FREE money to help you pay your college expenses. Whether you’re in high school or college, scholarships are available to you. There are even awards for students in middle school and younger. You just need to do some research.

Below you’ll find links to some great festive scholarships to get you started.

Holiday Celebration Scholarship
Amount:  $1,000
Deadline:  December 31, 2020

Timber Works Tree Care Scholarship
Amount:  $1,000
Deadline:  January 18, 2021

Scholars Helping Collars Scholarship 
Amounts:  $1,500, $300, $200
Deadline:  February 28, 2021

Sweet and Simple Scholarship
Amount:  $1,500
Deadline:  February 28, 2021

Angel Scholarship
Amount:  Varies
Deadline:  March 1, 2021 (New posting in January)

Create-A-Greeting-Card Scholarship
Amount:  $10,000
Deadline:  March 9, 2021

National Candy Technologists Scholarship
Amount:  $5,000
Deadline:  April 3, 2021

Flavor of the Month Scholarship
Amount:  $1,500
Deadline:  July 31, 2021  

Ornament Scholarship
Amount:  $1,000
Deadline:  Watch for new 2021 scholarship posting

Sugar Spun Run Scholarship
Amount:  $500
Deadline:  Check for new scholarship posting on Jan. 1

Changing Information on Your Submitted FAFSA

Do you want to add another college code to your FAFSA? Have you moved since you submitted your FAFSA? When you reviewed your Student Aid Report (SAR), did you discover that you had made a mistake on one of the answers you gave?

Most students file their Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA electronically, and it’s quick and easy to make corrections online as well. Let’s look at the three examples given above.

  1. Add a school code. This one is super easy. Log in to FAFSA.gov using your FSA ID. Choose ‘Make FAFSA Corrections’. Use the tabs at the top of the first page of your FAFSA and/or use the ‘Next’ or ‘Previous’ buttons to find the list of college codes you’ve already submitted. Add your code(s), and don’t forget to click the ‘Submit’ button on the last page when you’re done. In a few days, you should receive another email telling you that your new Student Aid Report (SAR) is ready. Review your SAR once more to make sure your changes have been made.

2. Update your demographic information. If you’ve moved or have a new phone number, be sure to update your demographic information at fsaid.ed.gov (Manage My FSA ID) and FAFSA.gov (Make FAFSA Corrections). Don’t forget to click the ‘Submit’ button on the last page when you’re done. In a few days, you should receive another email telling you that your new Student Aid Report (SAR) is ready. Review your SAR once more to make sure your changes have been made. If your last name has changed, contact a financial aid officer at your college of choice and ask them what steps you need to take.

3. Make corrections. Log in to FAFSA.gov using your FSA ID. Choose ‘Make FAFSA Corrections’. Use the tabs at the top of the first page of your FAFSA and/or use the ‘Next’ or ‘Previous’ buttons to find the page that contains the incorrect information. Make the necessary changes, then be sure to click ‘Submit’ on the last page when you’re done. In a few days, you should receive another email telling you that your new Student Aid Report (SAR) is ready. Review your SAR once more to make sure your changes have been made.

Note: If any of the income figures you reported need to be changed, it’s likely that a financial aid officer at your college will need to make them for you. If this is the case, be sure to give them your Data Release Number (DRN), located near the top of your Student Aid Report (SAR). They cannot ask you for your FSA ID.

Keeping your FAFSA data current will help you avoid delays in the future. Be sure to review your SAR carefully to look for discrepancies. ­­If you encounter any problems, you can call Federal Student Aid (FSA) at 1.800.433.3243.

The EFC

The Expected Family Contribution (EFC) is a number that’s used to help determine your eligibility for federal and state financial aid. It’s important to know that your EFC is not the guaranteed amount of money you or your family will be required to contribute to your cost of attendance. It’s only a number used by your school to calculate your financial aid eligibility.

Each school that you selected on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) will use the EFC to determine how much aid you may receive at their individual institution. Your EFC is calculated through a formula that uses your family’s taxed and untaxed income, assets and benefits. The size of your family, the number of family members who’ll attend college during the academic year and the age of your older parent will also influence your EFC.

For a detailed guide on exactly how an EFC is calculated, you can check out The EFC Formula.

Financial aid administrators will subtract the EFC from the student’s cost of attendance to determine their financial need for the following federal student aid programs:

  • Federal Pell Grants
  • Federal Subsidized Student Loans
  • Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants
  • Federal Work-Study

Other federal and state scholarship programs will also use the EFC to determine your eligibility for additional aid. The EFC is calculated after you complete your FAFSA. If you’re planning to attend college next fall, make sure you submit the FAFSA as soon as possible. You can find the FAFSA online at FAFSA.gov.

Have You Submitted Your FAFSA?

The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) for next fall became available Oct. 1. That means people are applying for financial aid almost a year before they’ll need it for college. It’s a long time until the next fall semester starts, so why is it so important to file now?

It’s best to file your FAFSA as soon as you can once it becomes available. While some types of financial aid are available year-round, other forms are not.

Federal Work-Study
Work-study is a type of aid that is earned, rather than borrowed. Your eligibility is determined by your financial need. Students use the money they earn at a part-time job to pay toward their college expenses. There is a limit to the number of work-study jobs available each semester, so if you don’t submit your FAFSA early and answer yes to the “I’m interested in work-study” question, those jobs could all be filled before you start the school year.

Oklahoma Tuition Aid Grant (OTAG)
OTAG is a grant funded by the state of Oklahoma for students who are Oklahoma residents and will be enrolled at an Oklahoma college or technology center. It’s an example of first-come, first served aid because it’s funded only once a year. Typically, OTAG receives more eligible applications than can be awarded with available funds, and how early a student applies can be the deciding factor in whether that student is offered an OTAG award. To apply, you simply have to complete a FAFSA. Your eligibility for OTAG is determined by your financial need, and the amount of the award is $1,000 ($500 in fall and spring).

Oklahoma Tuition Equalization Grant (OTEG)
OTEG is also funded by the state of Oklahoma, and goes to students who demonstrate financial need on a first-come, first served basis. Recipients must be Oklahoma residents. To receive this grant, your annual family income must be at or below $50,000, and the grant can only be used at an approved private/independent, not-for-profit postsecondary institution in Oklahoma. OTEG funds are sent to the approved institutions; students to be awarded OTEG will be selected and notified by the institutions. The grant pays $2,000 ($1,000 in fall and spring).

Visit OKcollegestart.org to learn more about OTAG and OTEG and a list of approved OTEG schools.

Be sure to submit your FAFSA as soon as you can. You don’t want to miss out on these chances for earned and free money for college that doesn’t have to be repaid!

I Submitted the FAFSA. Now What?

The new 2021-2022 FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) was released on October 1, and students are encouraged to complete this financial aid application as soon as possible. After submitting the FAFSA online, you may be wondering what your next steps are. Here’s what you can expect.

Upon submitting the FAFSA, you’ll see a confirmation page on the screen. You’ll also receive a confirmation email which confirms your FAFSA was submitted and is being processed. After a few days, you’ll receive your Student Aid Report, or SAR, by email as well. The SAR is a summary of the information you listed on your FAFSA. Be sure to review your SAR for any errors.

When your FAFSA is processed, it’s sent to the schools you listed on your application. Watch for communication from the financial aid offices at those schools. They’ll let you know if any additional documentation is required. Financial aid offices at those schools will also send you an aid offer after you’ve been accepted. The aid offer explains the types of financial aid available to you. Read this offer carefully as there may be additional steps you need to take to accept or decline certain types of aid. You don’t have to accept everything offered.

Watch this short video from OCAP explaining financial aid and the FAFSA to learn more!