Category Archives: Student Aid Report (SAR)

I Submitted the FAFSA. Now What?

The 2018-2019 FAFSA opened on October 1, and students are encouraged to complete the application as soon as possible. After submitting the FAFSA online, you may be wondering what your next steps are. Here’s what to expect.

Upon submitting the FAFSA, you will see a confirmation page on the screen. You will also receive a confirmation email, sent to the address listed on your FAFSA. This lets you know your FAFSA was submitted and is being processed.

After a few days, you’ll receive your Student Aid Report, or SAR, by email as well. The SAR is a summary of the information you listed on your FAFSA. Be sure to review your SAR and correct any errors.

When your FAFSA is processed, it is sent to the schools you listed on the application. Watch for communication from the financial aid offices at those schools. They will let you know if any additional documentation is needed. Financial aid offices at those schools will also send you an award letter after you’ve been accepted. Award letters explain what financial aid is available to you. Read this letter carefully as there may be additional steps you need to take to accept or decline certain types of aid.

Watch this short video from Federal Student Aid to learn more!

Tell me what I need to know about the SAR.

What’s a SAR?

Your Student Aid Report (SAR) will be sent to you either by mail or email within two weeks after submitting your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). If you provided an email address on your FAFSA, you’ll receive instructions on how to access your SAR online. If there’s not a working email address available, a signature is missing or your Social Security Number doesn’t match your record at the Social Security Administration, you’ll receive either a SAR or a SAR Acknowledgement through the mail. All students with an FSA ID can view or print their SARs after logging in at FAFSA.gov.

What do I need to do after I receive my SAR?

Read the first page carefully. If you need to supply more information to your financial aid office, it will give you further instructions.

  1. Look for the Expected Family Contribution (EFC) on the first page in the upper right corner. Your financial aid office needs the EFC to determine how much aid you may be able to receive.
  2. Review the entire SAR for mistakes. If you find anything that needs to be corrected, log in to your FAFSA at FAFSA.gov. You can mail a paper copy of the SAR showing your corrections, but this is where an online FAFSA can really pay off; making corrections through the mail can take weeks!
  3. Find the Data Release Number (DRN). It will be listed below the EFC. You’ll need the DRN if you choose to allow your college to change certain information on your FAFSA. Speak to someone your school’s Financial Aid office if there will be a significant change in your income or your parents’ income during the current year.
  4. The data from your SAR will also be sent to each college that you listed in the School Code section of your FAFSA. If you’re in a time crunch, you can call the financial aid office at your school of choice to verify that they’ve received your information.

Don’t ignore your SAR! It’s an important document that will keep you informed throughout the financial aid process.

How Much Money Will You Get for College?

Now that you’ve submitted your FAFSA, you may be wondering when you’ll hear how much financial aid you’ll receive for college. Will you know before the end of the year or will you wait until a few months after the first? Good question! Actually the schools we surveyed provided very different responses to that question and that’s probably because the 2017-18 FAFSA process has changed dramatically from what it had been in prior years.  Schools are adjusting their timelines and staff to make sure financial aid award notifications will be sent out as early as possible. Some colleges have already started sending award letters to their students, while others will send them anywhere from January to April.

No matter the time frame, if you’re questioning this process, contact the school(s) to which you’ve applied. They’ll let you know when they plan to send financial aid notifications and if they’ll go electronically or by snail mail. Most have deadlines attached for accepting or declining the aid you’ve been awarded so don’t miss out! Take the necessary steps to make sure you receive all the financial aid for which you’re eligible.

How to Finish the FAFSA, Final Step: Follow-up

FAFSA Step 5So you’ve completed, signed and submitted the FAFSA, now what? It’s time to follow up!

Keep an eye on your email for something called a Student Aid Report (SAR) as well as information from the schools to which you chose to send your FAFSA results.

Your SAR will provide you with some basic information about your eligibility for federal student aid. When you receive your SAR carefully review it and make sure your information is listed correctly. If you find a mistake, you will need to correct and resubmit your FAFSA.

Some schools may ask for more information, so be sure to provide any additional documentation they may require. Follow up with the school’s financial aid office if you have questions.

What’s all the hype about the FAFSA? Why is it so important?

The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is an application submitted to the federal government. It’s basically a snapshot of your financial situation. The information you submit on your FAFSA is used to determine how much federal and state financial aid you may be able to receive to help you pay for college.

Even if you don’t think you’ll qualify for financial aid, submit your FAFSA anyway. It’s not uncommon for students to assume they won’t qualify, only to be pleasantly surprised to find that they are eligible to receive one or more types of aid. Keep in mind that many scholarship applications now require a copy of your Student Aid Report (SAR), which is the report you receive after you submit your FAFSA.

By submitting the FAFSA, you’re not automatically signing up for student loans or committing to any colleges. You’re simply giving the college(s) you’re interested in attending an opportunity to discuss your financial aid options with you. So be sure to fill out the 2017-18 FAFSA as soon as possible after Oct. 1 this year. Visit FAFSA.gov for more information.

Your Acronym Glossary

Acronyms, schmacroynms! What do they all mean? As you navigate your way through the financial aid process you’ll run across plenty of three to four letter terms that may seem like a foreign language. Let us try to help make some sense of it all!

Adjusted Gross Income (AGI)
Your or your family’s wages, salaries, interest, dividends, etc., minus certain deductions from income as reported on a federal income tax return. Commonly referred to as AGI.

Agreement to Serve (ATS)
The binding agreement you must sign to receive a TEACH Grant. By signing the ATS, you agree to teach (1) full-time, (2) in a high-need field, (3) at a low-income school or educational service agency that serves certain low-income schools, and (4) for at least four complete academic years within eight years after completing (or ceasing enrollment in) the course of study for which you received the grant.

Cost of Attendance (COA)
COA includes tuition and fees; room and board (or a housing and food allowance); and allowances for books, supplies, transportation, loan fees, and dependent care. It also includes miscellaneous and personal expenses, including an allowance for the rental or purchase of a personal computer; costs related to a disability; and reasonable costs for eligible study-abroad programs.

Data Release Number (DRN)
The four-digit number assigned to your FAFSA that allows you to release your FAFSA data to schools you did not list on your original FAFSA. You need this number if you contact the Federal Student Aid Information Center to make corrections to your mailing address or the schools you listed on your FAFSA. You find this number below the confirmation number on your FAFSA submission confirmation page or in the top right-hand corner of your Student Aid Report (SAR).

Expected Family Contribution (EFC)
This is the number that’s used to determine your eligibility for federal student financial aid. This number results from the financial information you provide in your FAFSA, the application for federal student aid. Your EFC is reported to you on your Student Aid Report (SAR).

FAFSA
Free Application for Federal Student Aid, the FREE application used to apply for federal student aid, such as federal grants, loans, and work-study.

FSA ID
The FSA ID is a username and password combination that serves as a student’s or parent’s identifier to allow access to personal information in various U.S. Department of Education systems and acts as a digital signature on some online forms.

Satisfactory Academic Programs (SAP)
A school’s standards for satisfactory academic progress toward a degree or certificate offered by that institution.

Student Aid Report (SAR)
A summary of the information you submitted on your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). You receive this report via e-mail a few days after your FAFSA has been processed. If there are no corrections or additional information you must provide, the SAR will contain your EFC, which is the number that’s used to determine your eligibility for federal student aid.

To learn more about financial aid terms, check out the glossary through the U.S. Department of Education.

FAFSA Follow-up

If you’ve submitted the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), congratulations! You’ve just taken a very important step on your way to college. Now, what should you expect?

  1. You’ll receive a Student Aid Report (SAR).

Within a few days of submitting the FAFSA you’ll get an email containing a link to your online Student Aid Report (SAR) information. This will be sent to the email address you provided on your FAFSA. Watch for an email from FederalStudentAidFAFSA@cpsemail.ed.gov. Consider adding this address to your favorites, or to a safe sender list, so the message doesn’t go to Spam. If you didn’t supply an email address, you’ll get your SAR through snail mail several days later.

Review your SAR carefully to verify that everything is correct. If you see any errors that need to be corrected, log in at FAFSA.gov using your FSA ID and correct the information. If you’re unable to change the data in any particular field, be sure to call the FAFSA hotline, 1.800.4FED AID (1.800.433.3243) and explain the situation. Once you hit ‘Submit’ again, any corrections you make will show up on a revised SAR that you’ll receive within a few days.

  1. You may be selected for verification.

If your FAFSA has been selected for a random review process, called verification, you’ll receive details on how to proceed so your college’s financial aid office can verify your information before you receive federal financial aid. The summary on the first page of your SAR will list any additional steps you need to take.

  1. You’ll want to follow up with financial aid.

Your SAR will not tell you exactly how much aid your college can award you from every possible source. Visit with the financial aid department at the college you’re interested in attending. They can walk you through your financial aid package, collect any missing information, and let you know what to expect going forward.

Visit the Department of Education to learn more about what to expect after you submit the FAFSA.

What’s a SAR and When Will I Get One?

The Student Aid Report (SAR) is a paper or electronic document that gives you some basic information about your eligibility for federal student aid and lists your answers to the questions on your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

After you complete your FAFSA, you should receive your SAR from Federal Student Aid. This document will be sent to the email address you supplied on your FAFSA, usually within a few days after you submit the FAFSA. If you haven’t seen it in your inbox by then, be sure to check your spam or junk mail folders. The schools you list on your FAFSA will receive your SAR data electronically and begin the process of outlining your award package, which will include the types and amounts of financial aid you’re eligible to receive.

The SAR contains all data reported on your FAFSA. Read your SAR carefully to make sure all of your information is correct. Most errors can be fixed through your FAFSA online at FAFSA.gov. If there is an error in a field you can’t access, call the Federal Student Aid hotline at 1.800.4 FED AID (1.800.433.3243), or send your question to FederalStudentAidCustomerService@ed.gov.

Your SAR will also tell you if your FAFSA has been selected for verification. If it has, you’ll be given instructions about what to do next. Supplying the information required for verification is mandatory. You can’t receive federal financial aid until the verification process is complete.

Reading your SAR lets you know what’s going on with your financial aid application before you visit a financial aid office. It can help you prepare for your visit by having any necessary documents with you when you arrive. This will save time and reduce the number of visits you’ll have to make to the financial aid office. That’s a win-win situation for everyone!

Be sure to read your SAR!

What’s a SAR? If you’re not sure, you’d better keep reading!

After you complete your FAFSA, you should receive a Student Aid Report (SAR) from Federal Student Aid.  This document will be sent to the email address you supplied on your FAFSA, usually within a few days after you submit the FAFSA. If you haven’t seen it in your inbox yet, be sure to check your spam or junk mail folders.

The SAR contains all data reported on your FAFSA. Read your SAR carefully to make sure all of your information is correct. Most errors can be fixed through your FAFSA online at FAFSA.gov. If there is an error in a field you can’t access, call the Federal Student Aid hotline at 1.800.4 FED AID (1.800.433.3243), or send your question to FederalStudentAidCustomerService@ed.gov. You should receive an answer to your email within one business day.

Your SAR will also tell you if your FAFSA has been selected for verification. If it has, you’ll be given instructions about what to do next. Supplying the information required for verification is mandatory. You can’t receive federal financial aid until the verification process is complete.

Reading your SAR lets you know what’s going on with your financial aid application before you visit a financial aid office. It can help you prepare for your visit by having any necessary documents with you when you arrive. This will save time and reduce the number of visits you’ll have to make to the financial aid office. That’s a win-win situation for everyone!

What’s Verification?

After you submit your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), you should expect to receive correspondence from the school you plan to attend. You may receive an award letter listing all of the financial assistance your school can offer you, or you may be asked to provide additional information or documentation before your financial aid can be determined. You may even be selected for a process called verification.

Verification is the method your school uses to confirm the data provided on your FAFSA is accurate. The federal government requires colleges and universities to verify or confirm the information reported by some students and their parent(s) on this form. There are many reasons why a student is chosen for this process. You may be selected at random, your FAFSA application may be incomplete or your FAFSA may contain contradicting information.

If you’re chosen for verification, don’t fret. This is a common procedure, so be sure to address your school’s requests as soon as possible and update and/or correct your FAFSA as needed. Once the process is complete, your financial aid award should be finalized. If you have questions, contact your school’s financial aid office.